high altitude science Archives - StratoStar
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high altitude science Tag

Did you dissect something when you were in school? Most of us can recall being asked to dissect a frog or worm when we were students. Some may have even worked on turtles, pigs, cats, or mice. For a long time dissecting real species was...

Almost an entire month has passed since the eclipse happened, but the team at StratoStar is still on cloud nine. We loved sending two high altitude weather balloons to the edge of space during the event. Students from 25 different schools prepared experiments for the...

As the new school year kicks off, you might be looking for new ways to get students involved and excited to learn. One of the best ways to get your students excited and interested in learning is by introducing high altitude science into your classroom....

Have you ever dreamed of launching something to space or thought about what it would be like to travel to the edge of space yourself? With a high altitude weather balloon project you can do that! Well, part of that. We can’t actually send you...

If you’re wondering, “what is high altitude science?”, then you can breathe a sigh of relief because we’re going to explain what it is, why it’s important, and how you can start taking advantage of it with your students. What is high altitude science? At the heart...

High altitude science experiments provide the perfect learning opportunity for your students. Not only will they get hands-on learning experiences, but they’ll actually get to touch an experiment that travels to the edge of space. How much will they love that?! Check out these great...

High altitude science projects have come a long way since the early days of space exploration. Mankind has landed on the moon, orbited the earth, sent countless satellites through the deep unknowns of space, and even jumped from a weather balloon that rose up through the Stratosphere. Recently, space explorations identified that Mars, one of Earth’s neighboring planets, has flowing water. While scientists have known for years about Mars’ frozen water, they were surprised by recent discovery of flowing water. Which leads to the question, why hasn’t high altitude science resulted in putting an astronaut on Mars?