StratoStar Weather Balloon Flights | STEM Projects | High Altitude Science
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Welcome To The Mission Control

ARCHIVE

Welcome To The Mission Control

ARCHIVE

CHECK OUT SOME OF OUR

PREVIOUS STRATOSTAR WEATHER BALLOON FLIGHTS

Wyoming StratoSAT Launch
Purdue University High Altitude StratoStar Launch
Indian Valley Middle Space Balloon Launch & Flight
StratoStar Wyoming Launch

StratoStar makes launches easy and fun. Here’s

HOW IT WORKS

Previous

EXPERIMENTS

StratoStar not only makes projects easy for educators to implement, we will also customize a project for your curriculum. While the core project remains the same (your classroom launches a weather balloon to the edge of space), there are an unlimited number of experiments your students can perform using this project. Would you like to see some examples?

What does the stratosphere look like?

Students can capture their entire StratoStar mission to the edge of space using small video cameras. These cameras allow an emotional connection with the project and provide content for social media. These videos and images are not only exciting to watch, but they are also packed with science and math topics.

What happens to water bears in space?

Water bears, which are also known as tardigrades can survive in extreme environments. These tiny eight-legged animals have survived a fully exposed trip to space and lived to tell the story.  Students can use these creatures as tiny astronauts in a StratoStar balloon launch. Integrate lessons about biology so students can see the effect of space on living creatures.

Can an egg survive a trip to space?

Most students participate in  some sort of egg drop experiment during their time in elementary or high school, but the extreme egg drop challenge tests students’ engineering skills. Their mission is to ensure their egg astronaut survives a launch to the edge of space. Will their egg make it back to the surface in one piece?

Is space radioactive?

Earth’s atmosphere protects us from most of the radiation from space, known as Cosmic Rays. The origin of this radiation is somewhat of a mystery but scientist believe these rays come from exploding stars.  Students can design experiments with Geiger Counters to measure radiation throughout the atmosphere as their weather balloon rises to the edge of space.

Can you hear music in space?

Can you hear music in space? Students find out with this StratoStar experiment. Students discover the answer with two MP3 players on a high-altitude weather balloon mission.  As the balloon rises into the stratosphere the air is thin and less able to carry sound.

What is your experiment idea?

Do you have your own idea for a STEM education project? StratoStar will help you customize your own experiment and help you launch it to the edge of space. Also, if you have a subject you’d like to target (like biology, for example), we can help you design your own experiment to help your students get excited about school through project-based learning.

StratoStar projects work for all kinds of

STEM SUBJECTS

Chemistry & Weather Balloons Quick Facts

The Antarctic hole in the ozone layer was announced in 1985 by scientists with the British Antarctic Survey. The hole was discovered via high altitude balloon. The ozone concentration is detected by passing air samples through a diluted solution of potassium iodide to produce a weak electrical current proportional to the ozone concentration of the sampled air.

There’s more to chemistry than what’s done in a laboratory on the Earth’s surface.

There are many different reactions happening far above us in the edge of space. The differences in temperature and in pressure in the edge of space can alter the properties of matter and the behavior of gases. Your students shouldn’t be limited to experimenting with the immediate world around them. StratoStar offers your students an opportunity to experiment in an environment generally only available to research scientists. There are prime opportunities in near space to teach the concepts of thermochemistry and the effects atmospheric temperature changes will have on your students’ experiments.

Characteristics of the environment of near space

• Temperature – ground temp to -90c (varies with the seasons).

• Pressure – sea level (14.7 psi) to 18.5 miles above the earth (0.22 psi).

• Turbulence – Just like an airplane, the payloads experience turbulence going through the jet stream.

• Flight Velocities – Payloads can travel up to 200 mph in the jet stream and fall at speeds of over 100 mph.

Tools your students may use

• Plug and play flight sensors

• Temperature

• Pressure

• Humidity

• Geiger Counter

• Accelerometer

•  Gyroscope

• Cameras

• Video

• Still

Concepts that can be explored near-space

• Properties of Matter

• Atomic Structure and Periodic Table

• Behavior of Gasses

• Thermochemistry

• Solutions

• Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry

• Scientific Writing

Project based learning ideas for teaching basic theory

Students can easily study the behavior of gases with a high altitude weather balloon. The volume of helium in the balloon is set because of the helium tank capacity, and students can use a camera from the experiment box to watch the balloon expand as it ascends into the atmosphere. While the balloon is in flight, students will receive real time measurements of the temperature and pressure of the atmosphere from the sensors on board the balloon. The students can then investigate the Ideal Gas Law and Archimedes Principle in a mission-based cross discipline project that meets state standards.These are just a few examples of what can be done with a StratoStar system. We can help you develop ideas for student experiments that are fun, exciting, and meet state standards. As a StratoStar customer, you will also have access to a network of other educators who have implemented high altitude platform launches in their curriculum.

Physics & Weather Balloons Quick Facts

Before satellites, scientists used balloons to gather data about our Earth. In 1967, the GHOST (Global Horizontal Sounding Technique) balloon was launched from New Zealand. It stayed in the air for one year and circled the southern hemisphere 25 times.  The balloon carried an electronics package that transmitted a radio signal in order to track the balloon and gather data for global weather forecasting.

Earth presents scientists with a strange sort of challenge. It’s our home, the one place we know best of all. At the same time, however, there are portions of our world that are as alien to us as Jupiter or Mars. One of the least studied parts of Earth lies in the upper atmosphere. With StratoStar, your students can join the ranks of scientists around the world in pioneering the exploration of the edge of space. They can study the sun as a star with an experiment that will get them closer to our sun than otherwise possible. They can test their theories on atmospheric properties with an experiment floating in the atmosphere itself.  There’s no limit to the Earth and space science concepts that teach your students with a StratoStar project.

Characteristics of the environment of near space

• Temperature – ground temp to -90c (varies with the seasons).

• Pressure – sea level (14.7 psi) to 18.5 miles above the earth (0.22 psi).

• Turbulence – Just like an airplane, the payloads experience turbulence going through the jet stream.

• Flight Velocities – Payloads can travel up to 200 mph in the jet stream and fall at speeds of over 100 mph.

Tools your students may use

• Plug and play flight sensors

• Temperature

• Pressure

• Humidity

• Geiger Counter

• Accelerometer

•  Gyroscope

• Cameras

• Video

• Still

Concepts that can be explored near-space

• Investigating the Sun as a Star

• Principles of Gravity

• Deep space Cosmic Rays

• Planetary Weather systems

• Atmospheric Properties

Project based learning ideas for teaching basic theory

Students can easily study the behavior of gasses with a high altitude weather balloon. The volume of helium in the balloon is set because of the helium tank capacity, and students can use a camera from the experiment box to watch the balloon expand as it ascends into the atmosphere. While the balloon is in flight, students will receive real time measurements of the temperature and pressure of the atmosphere from the sensors on board the balloon. The students can then investigate the Ideal Gas Law and Archimedes Principle in a mission-based cross discipline project that meets state standards.These are just a few examples of what can be done with a StratoStar system. We can help you develop ideas for student experiments that are fun, exciting, and meet state standards. As a StratoStar customer, you will also have access to a network of other educators who have implemented high altitude platform launches in their curriculum.

Earth Science & Weather Balloons Quick Facts

Before satellites, scientists used balloons to gather data about our Earth. In 1967, the GHOST (Global Horizontal Sounding Technique) balloon was launched from New Zealand. It stayed in the air for one year and circled the southern hemisphere 25 times.  The balloon carried an electronics package that transmitted a radio signal in order to track the balloon and gather data for global weather forecasting.

Earth presents scientists with a strange sort of challenge. It’s our home, the one place we know best of all. At the same time, however, there are portions of our world that are as alien to us as Jupiter or Mars. One of the least studied parts of Earth lies in the upper atmosphere. With StratoStar, your students can join the ranks of scientists around the world in pioneering the exploration of the edge of space. They can study the sun as a star with an experiment that will get them closer to our sun than otherwise possible. They can test their theories on atmospheric properties with an experiment floating in the atmosphere itself.  There’s no limit to the Earth and space science concepts that your students can study.

Characteristics of the environment of near space

• Temperature – ground temp to -90c (varies with the seasons).

• Pressure – sea level (14.7 psi) to 18.5 miles above the earth (0.22 psi).

• Turbulence – Just like an airplane, the payloads experience turbulence going through the jet stream.

• Flight Velocities – Payloads can travel up to 200 mph in the jet stream and fall at speeds of over 100 mph.

Tools your students may use

• Plug and play flight sensors

• Temperature

• Pressure

• Humidity

• Geiger Counter

• Accelerometer

•  Gyroscope

• Cameras

• Video

• Still

Concepts that can be explored near-space

• Investigating the Sun as a Star

• Principles of Gravity

• Deep space Cosmic Rays

• Planetary Weather systems

• Atmospheric Properties

Project based learning ideas for teaching basic theory

Students can easily study the behavior of gasses with a high altitude weather balloon. The volume of helium in the balloon is set because of the helium tank capacity, and students can use a camera from the experiment box to watch the balloon expand as it ascends into the atmosphere. While the balloon is in flight, students will receive real time measurements of the temperature and pressure of the atmosphere from the sensors on board the balloon. The students can then investigate the Ideal Gas Law and Archimedes Principle in a mission-based cross discipline project that meets state standards.These are just a few examples of what can be done with a StratoStar system. We can help you develop ideas for student experiments that are fun, exciting, and meet state standards. As a StratoStar customer, you will also have access to a network of other educators who have implemented high altitude platform launches in their curriculum.

launch your own mission to the

EDGE OF SPACE

Are you ready to track a weather balloon all the way to the edge of outer space? StratoStar makes it easy for educators to create a project that inspires and excites students about STEM education. Would you like to follow our next mission to see what a launch is really like?